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Star Trek question:

scourge

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Star Trek question:
« on: August 01, 2018, 07:27:29 AM »
A lot can go wrong with those ships, but I can’t recall any of it—why are some causes of the ship’s mechanical failure over the years—specifically looking for pets of the ship that stop working and causes that are maybe technical in nature but not neccisarily. Can use any Star Trek but TNG is my fav

altoon

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Re: Star Trek question:
« Reply #1 on: August 01, 2018, 09:22:18 AM »
Can't recall anything just stop working or broken down on TNG.  That kind of stuff happened on DS9 because it was Cardassian tech or was incompatible with Federation tech and cause problems .

Thorne

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Re: Star Trek question:
« Reply #2 on: August 01, 2018, 10:26:40 AM »
Federation starships are built with triple redundancy so it takes a lot for something to go completely apeshit on them, usually 9 times out of 10 it's either environmental factors or battle damage that borks whole systems... but then you've got all these genius engineers that are basically MacGyvers so stuff rarely stays busted very long.

Clownprince23

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Re: Star Trek question:
« Reply #3 on: August 01, 2018, 10:59:28 AM »
Didn't the Enterprise A in Final Frontier have a lot of issues just because it wasn't really sea worthy yet? Been a while since I've seen it, I just remember Scotty working on a bunch of stuff.

MPagar

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Re: Star Trek question:
« Reply #4 on: August 01, 2018, 04:03:26 PM »
Even the idea of mechanical failure was frowned upon in the series bible. Having it breaking down without outside forces wasn’t supposed to be a catalyst for any trouble the crew would run into for that episode, at least by Next Gen.

I don’t remember watching much TOS stuff, so there might be some there. I know the Enterprise series had a fair share, but those were also starships at their infancy.

HalloweenJack

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Re: Star Trek question:
« Reply #5 on: August 01, 2018, 04:44:27 PM »
Didn't the Enterprise A in Final Frontier have a lot of issues just because it wasn't really sea worthy yet? Been a while since I've seen it, I just remember Scotty working on a bunch of stuff.

I think you're right

Thorne

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Re: Star Trek question:
« Reply #6 on: August 01, 2018, 05:18:23 PM »
OK the mechanical problems were the result of them taking the ship out before it was fully prepped, "Oh yeah that was going to be installed Tuesday"

Clownprince23

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Re: Star Trek question:
« Reply #7 on: August 01, 2018, 05:25:35 PM »
OK the mechanical problems were the result of them taking the ship out before it was fully prepped, "Oh yeah that was going to be installed Tuesday"


That's from Generations on board the Enterprise B when Kirk is asking the Captain to use the tractor beam and some other things.


The Shuruku Demon

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Re: Star Trek question:
« Reply #8 on: August 01, 2018, 07:04:28 PM »
The Enterprise-A was newly constructed at the end of Star Trek IV; so new that it's systems hadn't been tested yet. Kirk and his crew took the ship out for a shakedown cruise at the end of Star Trek IV to shake out any bugs in the new systems.

Star Trek V opens with the Enterprise docked at a starbase, and Scotty reporting on the malfunctioning systems which had been discovered during the shakedown cruise, but the ship was called out on an urgent mission before those issues could be fully ironed out.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oMMpbIKrvFI

The systems on Enterprise ships don't generally break down after they've been through the testing stage, for the reasons Thorne gave. As he said, when we do occasionally see system failures on an Enterprise, it's not usually because of general wear and tear, but because someone or something has interfered with the ship in some way.

An example from TNG would be the Season 2 episode, "Contagion", where the USS Yamamoto (a Galaxy-class ship like the Enterprise-D) downloaded a computer program from an alien probe, which proved incompatible with their systems, and essentially acted like a computer virus, causing ship-wide malfunctions. Those malfunctions eventually led to the ship exploding, due to a failure in antimatter containment in the warp engine.

The Enterprise-D downloaded log entries from the Yamato before it's destruction, which contained the same alien program, causing the Enterprise to experience similar system failures. But having already seen what happened to the Yamato, the Enterprise crew managed to figure out the cause of the failures, and solved the problem by performing what amounts to a system restore on the Enterprise computer.
« Last Edit: August 01, 2018, 07:10:57 PM by The Shuruku Demon »

Thorne

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Re: Star Trek question:
« Reply #9 on: August 01, 2018, 07:27:41 PM »
Or someone fucks up something in the Holodeck and it tries to take over the ship, happens every damn season!

scourge

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Re: Star Trek question:
« Reply #10 on: August 01, 2018, 10:05:53 PM »

An example from TNG would be the Season 2 episode, "Contagion", where the USS Yamamoto (a Galaxy-class ship like the Enterprise-D) downloaded a computer program from an alien probe, which proved incompatible with their systems, and essentially acted like a computer virus, causing ship-wide malfunctions. Those malfunctions eventually led to the ship exploding, due to a failure in antimatter containment in the warp engine.

The Enterprise-D downloaded log entries from the Yamato before it's destruction, which contained the same alien program, causing the Enterprise to experience similar system failures. But having already seen what happened to the Yamato, the Enterprise crew managed to figure out the cause of the failures, and solved the problem by performing what amounts to a system restore on the Enterprise computer.

Or someone fucks up something in the Holodeck and it tries to take over the ship, happens every damn season!

This is actually the kind of thing I'm most hoping for... more pls

altoon

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Re: Star Trek question:
« Reply #11 on: August 01, 2018, 10:29:35 PM »
The holodecks always malfunction or become selfaware or some shit on all the shows that have holodecks like Thorne said once a season. Well not on DS9 but TNG and Voyager it was given.

Thorne

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Re: Star Trek question:
« Reply #12 on: August 01, 2018, 10:39:00 PM »
DS9 knew how to run a Holodeck, pure pleasure baby.

scourge

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Re: Star Trek question:
« Reply #13 on: August 02, 2018, 08:20:02 AM »
Yeah the Holedeck becoming deadly is a big one.

More specific stuff like:

"the computer shut down a forcefield in an open shuttle bay"

or

"magnetic seals on the anti-matter chamber are decaying"

is what I'm after

MPagar

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Re: Star Trek question:
« Reply #14 on: August 02, 2018, 04:50:33 PM »
In the more ‘current” timeline shown? Not gonna happen on its own. Or super unlikely.

Someone mentioned the Enterprise-D having problems like that after getting infected by an Iconian virus, with another Starfleet infected ship actually shutting down the force field in the shuttle bay like you mentioned, but as I pointed out earlier, any system errors that happen without any type of outside interference was actually originally looked down upon.

Now Voyager was supposed to cover these problems at its original concept- a Fed ship not having the chance for standard maintenance or receiving I’m compatible parts. I think it showed it early on, but was ultimately ignored or conveniently fixed later on, which led one of the show runners, Ron Moore, to take these concept he pushed for and implement it into the reboot of Battlestar Galactica.