Herochat

Waid says no such thing as magic...

NeoGreenLantern

  • ********
  • 15633
  • +83/-19
    • View Profile
Re: Waid says no such thing as magic...
« Reply #15 on: February 22, 2018, 07:49:42 PM »
Because thats not what he said at all. He said uru can be induced to admit gravitons. The metal already has that property before Odin does anything. Odin's enchantment controls the effect.

But I also don't see how enchanting gravity control it is anymore ridiculous than enchanting truth into a lasso, enchanting strength into a belt, or enchanting lightening into a hammer.

Gree

  • ********
  • 8162
  • +37/-6
    • View Profile
Re: Waid says no such thing as magic...
« Reply #16 on: February 22, 2018, 08:37:06 PM »
Then you clearly aren’t going to get it. It’s pretty much exactly what he said

There’s a difference between enchanting a lasso to bring out truth in someone or shoot lightning  vs “Uru has special properties to control gravitrons because the master dwarve smiths know how to craft well enough that it seems like magic and Odins enchantment is an on and off switch to the gravitron field”.


XerxesTWD

  • ************
  • 5902
  • +74/-22
  • You can't park here, buddy. Earth is closed today.
    • View Profile
Re: Waid says no such thing as magic...
« Reply #17 on: February 22, 2018, 08:39:17 PM »
You really need to re-read what you posted to start the thread, Gree.

Gree

  • ********
  • 8162
  • +37/-6
    • View Profile
Re: Waid says no such thing as magic...
« Reply #18 on: February 22, 2018, 10:30:21 PM »
I think you guys need to read the article again

”Based upon its observed properties–that it is nigh-indestructible, cannot be lifted by anyone except if they be as worthy as Thor and always returns to his hand–there can be only one explanation: “Uru metal” must actually be an exotic form of matter that can be induced to emit gravitons. Gravitons are particles (theoretically predicted but, unlike the Higgs boson, still not experimentally confirmed) that mediate the force of gravity, just like photons transmit the force of electromagnetism. While we are unable to forge Uru metal on Earth, the dwarven blacksmiths, being as advanced compared to us as we are to our early ancestors, could craft a hammer whose properties seem like magic to us

Why do the hammers properties “seem like magic” if they are actually magic? I’m Obviously being hyperbolic in my opening post but if he’s describing everything in scientific terms while saying that things only seem like magic what does that mean to you? If Odins enchantment activates a graviton particle, does that make classic hammer sound mystical, or at all like 616 hammer works?
« Last Edit: February 22, 2018, 10:34:51 PM by Gree »

Gree

  • ********
  • 8162
  • +37/-6
    • View Profile
Re: Waid says no such thing as magic...
« Reply #19 on: February 22, 2018, 10:46:54 PM »
If you guys don’t see it agree to disagree then

Strawman Abridged

  • *****
  • 1840
  • +18/-5
    • View Profile
Re: Waid says no such thing as magic...
« Reply #20 on: February 23, 2018, 09:04:30 AM »
Magic is bullshit. It should really be done away with completely. Science is what rules the land.

The Shuruku Demon

  • ******
  • 2369
  • +22/-7
    • View Profile
Re: Waid says no such thing as magic...
« Reply #21 on: February 23, 2018, 10:42:24 AM »
I took this as a nod to Clarke's third law that any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinquishable from magic. I don't know if Waid quite came out and said that directly, but the explanation of how Mjolnir's enchantment worked seemed to be hinting at that. And of course, we're currently seeing an interpretation of Asgardians in the MCU which seem quite clearly science rather than magic-based.

The magic/science issue aside, I don't like the gravitons mechanic as an explanation for why unworthy folks can't lift Mjolnir, because it gets wonky when you apply it to beings with planet-moving strength. What happens when Waid's Earth-benching version of Superman tries to lift Mjolnir (assuming he's unworthy, for the sake of argument)? Does Mjolnir increase it's gravitational pull beyond that of the Earth's in order to resist being lifted? And is there a limit to the gravitational pull Mjolnir can emit? What happens if an unworthy being strong enough to move a black hole tries to lift it?

If you wanted to explain the enchantment in psuedoscientific terms, there are alternative theories you could come up with that don't have these kind of problems (like the hammer selectively redirecting kinetic energy applied to it).